Disney Plus subscriber numbers are soaring — but that's not the whole story

Hi! Welcome to the Insider Advertising daily for August 6. I'm Lauren Johnson, a senior advertising reporter at Business Insider. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. Send me feedback or tips at ljohnson@businessinsider.com

Today's news: Disney Plus hits a new milestone but trails behind Netflix's revenue, salary data for top agency roles, and marketers weigh in on Microsoft's potential TikTok acquisition.

Disney Plus' "Mulan"Disney

Disney Plus' audience growth has wildly exceeded expectations but it brings in less than half the revenue Netflix does per subscriber

  • Disney Plus hit 60 million subscribers nine months since launching, a milestone that executives originally thought wouldn't happen until 2024.
  • However, Disney Plus' subscribers generate significantly less revenue per paying subscriber than rival Netflix. During the June quarter, Disney Plus' average revenue per paying subscriber was $4.62 while Netflix averages $10.80.
  • Disney Plus' average revenue per user was also dragged down last quarter by its price point in India.

Read the full story here.

Mark Read, CEO of WPP GroupReuters

Top ad industry salaries, revealed: How much the biggest holding companies including WPP, Publicis, and Omnicom pay employees, from junior account directors to global creative leads

  • Patrick Coffee dug into the US Office of Foreign Labor Certification's 2019 disclosure data to find out how much top roles are paid at the five largest ad holding companies: WPP, Publicis, Omnicom, IPG, and Dentsu.
  • According to the data, a chief creative officer at WPP makes between $830,000 to $880,000 a year while a chief strategy officer at Omnicom makes between $300,000 to $500,000.
  • The data looks at all foreign workers applying for both permanent green card visas and temporary H-1B, H1B1, and E-3 visas. It does not include every type of visa, pay rates for US-born employees, or compensation beyond base salaries.

Read the full story here.

TikTok CEO Kevin MayerMichael Buckner/WireImage

Marketers warily continue to spend on TikTok but some are building escape clauses into their contracts because of the political uncertainty

  • Dan Whateley and I looked at how agencies are reacting to Microsoft's reported acquisition of TikTok. Marketers said that they are not stopping ad spend but are reworking contracts with the possibility of moving spend to other platforms.
  • Lyle Stevens, CEO of the influencer-marketing platform Mavrck, said that marketers are unlikely to cut ad budgets in the near term but could pull budgets if TikTok's ownership is not resolved by the time of the US elections and holiday season. 

  • Microsoft has a mixed history with its advertising business and sold off most of it to AOL in 2015. However, an acquisition of TikTok could give the app some credibility with ad buyers, said Brendan Gahan, partner and chief social officer at ad agency Mekanism.

Read the full story here.

More stories we're reading:

  • A YouTube creator explains Amazon's efforts to become a major player in the influencer business, from affiliate commissions to livestreaming (Business Insider)
  • Houseplant sales are booming and so are 'Plantfluencers,' the social-media creators sharing plant tips, products, and content (Business Insider)
  • The face of department stores is radically changing, and could soon look more like a warehouse than a boutique (Business Insider)
  • As advertising plummets in Q2, NYT's total digital revenue exceeds print (AdExchanger)
  • 'A significant uptick in deal flow': Why Europe is becoming a hotbed of ad tech innovation (Digiday)

Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at ljohnson@businessinsider.com and subscribe to this daily email here.

— Lauren

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