Life after The Sopranos – cop death arrest, becoming Buddhist and a £6m painting

David Chase's mobster masterpiece The Sopranos is hailed as one of the greatest TV series ever.

It ran from 1999 to 2007 on HBO with the six seasons following the life of New Jersey crime boss, Tony Soprano.

The show covered every storyline imaginable from infidelity, sexuality, rape, cancer, to suicide.

And it even won praise from some real-life mafia members. Although, there was a scene they took issue with.

“A don doesn’t wear shorts,” remarked one after watching an episode showing Tony wearing shorts at a barbecue.

But the show changed TV history and paved the way for other giants such as The Wire, Mad Men and Breaking Bad.

As a result of the coronavirus lockdown, the show has now acquired a whole new legion of fans discovering its magic for the very first time.

Here Daily Star takes a look at what happened to The Sopranos' male cast after the show ended..

Have you been watching the show in lockdown? Let us know the comments below

James Gandolfini who played Tony Soprano

James Gandolfini was utterly iconic as overweight, balding mobster Tony Soprano, who was seeking therapy for panic attacks.

He was both a hero and a villain as we followed his insatiable thirst for money, power, revenge, and sex.

And let's not forget the divisive and sudden ending of The Sopranos which takes place at Holsten's diner and is very much left to the viewer to decide if Tony died.

The final scene, watched by at least 11.3m on the night, provoked such strong emotions that demands were made for creator David Chase to confirm Tony's fate.

He refused and said: “I have no interest in explaining, defending, reinterpreting, or adding to what is there."

By the end, the show had become so big that Gandolfini was a household name and reportedly making $1 million per episode.

He had been relatively unknown before The Sopranos, working on small-budget films and broadway.

After the show finished in 2007, he won countless awards for his portrayal of the mob boss, with it being regarded as one of the greatest performances in TV history.

Gandolfini went on to found the production company Attaboy Films and produced a number of films and documentaries, including one on injured Iraq war veterans.

In 2008, he married former model and actress Deborah Lin and welcomed a daughter with her named Liliana.

The actor was an extremely private man and "always secretly helping someone," his wife later revealed.

When asked if he found it difficult to deal with the fame he once said: "Yes, but only because in reality I’m so boring that I don’t want people to get close to me, because they’ll realise how boring I am, and they won’t want to watch anymore.

"I’m just a normal guy. It’s the writing that is interesting and the characters. The less said about me, the better."

The world was left reeling when he died aged 51 on June 19, 2013. He was found unconscious on the floor of a hotel in Rome by his teenage son, Michael, whom he shared with ex-wife Marcy Wudarski.

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Gandolfini was rushed to hospital but was later pronounced dead as a result of a heart attack.

His assistant Tom Richardson said the actor had stepped out for a day of sightseeing before returning to the hotel.

"The family had a marvelous day together, and when he returned to the hotel Jimmy [Gandolfini] went to the bathroom and that is when something happened," Richardson said back in 2013.

There was a huge turnout for his funeral in New York, which saw many of his co-stars attend. The Sopranos creator David Chase also gave a heartrending eulogy.

Gandolfini's body was later cremated and his ashes given to his mourning family.

During the 20th anniversary of The Sopranos, some of the cast were close to tears as they discussed working with the incredible actor.

Meanwhile, his son Michael, now 21, has followed in his father's footsteps to become an actor. He has been cast to play a younger Tony in Sopranos spin-off film, The Many Saints of Newark.

Robert Iler who played A.J. Soprano

Robert Iler landed the role of Tony's rebellious son AJ when he was aged 12 and appeared in all 86 episodes.

In the final series, AJ attempted to take his own life after his fiancee Blanca called off their engagement. He had also become obsessed with the Iraq war.

After The Sopranos ended, Iler, who was then in his 20s, largely kept out of the public eye taking only a couple of minor acting jobs in Law and Order 'just to get out of jury duty'.

He told his manager he "wanted six months off to go play poker and hang out with my friends and just do whatever."

But six months turned into years.

He was also arrested in 2001 with three pals and later pleaded guilty to mugging two tourists who had £28 stolen from them in New York.

A police report said Iler bragged and swore after his arrest, telling an officer: "Don't you worry about me – I'm a millionaire."

His mother Helen told reporters it was the first time her teen son had been in real-life trouble – "and it will be the last."

Iler, now 36, went on to have a stint in Las Vegas as a semi-pro poker player. He also battled drug and alcohol addiction.

He said last year: "I was drinking a lot back in the day, so I would make money playing poker and then I would lose it betting on sports or roulette.

"I have not been drunk in over seven years and hardcore drugs is also seven years. But I was taking Xanax every day and it took to me a long time to get off Xanax, and I had to go see a specialist, so that has been five years."

Iler also recently revealed he's barely seen any of The Sopranos episodes and finds it "torture" to watch James Gandolfini.

His last acting job is believed to have been in 2009.

He now hosts podcast Pajama Pants with his on-screen sister Jamie-Lynn Sigler.

Michael Imperioli who played Christopher Moltisanti

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Michael Imperioli not only starred as Tony's nephew Christopher, but he also wrote some of the episodes including From Where to Eternity.

The episode in season two sees him close to death in hospital after being repeatedly shot. He tells Tony and Paulie he's "crossed over to the other side" and been to hell. He also has a message for them: "Three o'clock."

Speaking about the script, Imperioli said: "It was fun to play with those complex, big ideas [Catholicism, heaven and hell].

"I don’t think they think much of the afterlife to be honest. But the episode came out well."

Christopher had some other major storylines, including choosing his loyalty to Tony over his own love for girlfriend Adriana (played by Drea de Matteo) by having her killed when she revealed she had been cooperating with the FBI.

He met his own grisly end in season six after he lost control of his car and crashed. Tony had been sat in the passenger seat, and being fed-up with Chris's drug-taking, seized the opportunity to suffocate him.

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Meanwhile, Imperioli's salary during the later seasons was estimated to be between $200,000 and $500,000 per episode.

After the Sopranos, he went on to have stints in various TV shows and films including Life on Mars, Watchmen, Lucifer, Law & Order, and Hawaii Five-0.

He also had a part in the animated Dreamworks film Shark Tale as Frankie.

More recently he starred in One Night in Miami, a film directed by Regina King about the fictional meeting of Malcolm X, Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, and Sam Cooke.

Imperioli, now aged 54 and a father-of-three, became a Buddhist in 2008 after realising he "needed to address some stuff internally."

He hosts meditation sessions on his Instagram account, makes music with band Zopa and is the host of a podcast called Talking Sopranos, which he presents alongside Steven R Schirripa, who played Bobby.

He is also reportedly co-developing a brand new scripted series for HBO. The project is described as a "meta blend of fact and fiction" loosely based on Imperioli’s experiences as a practicing Buddhist.

Tony Sirico who played Paulie 'Walnuts' Gualtieri

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Paulie was one of the show's most colourful, paranoid and jealous characters.

He was a bit of a sap at times and lucky not to have been killed by Tony, who came very close to bludgeoning him to death while the pair were on a boat.

He spent time in prison, often clashed with Christopher, shunned married life, battled cancer and adored his mother who later turned out to actually be his aunt.

Actor Sirico originally auditioned for the part of Uncle Junior (as did Frank Vincent aka Phil Leotardo), before the role was given to Dominic Chianese.

One of the show's writers, Terence Winter, also said he got a stern warning from Sirico about his character.

"The first thing Tony Sirico ever said to me — literally on day one — was, ‘You’re the new writer? Let me tell you something. If you ever write a script where I die? First, I die. Then you die.’ I was like, OK,” Winter revealed.

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And if that message wasn't clear enough, Sirico added: “I’m telling you. Don’t f***ing think about killing me."

Sirico, now aged 78, also used to get up mega early as he insisted on styling his hair himself because he didn't want anyone else to touch it.

He had his own real-life brushes with the law too.

When he was younger, he was part of a street gang, spent time in prison and was arrested around 28 times, including for robbery and an illegal-weapon charge.

His first arrest was when he was aged seven for stealing nickels from a newspaper stand.

"I was a pistol-packing guy," Sirico previously the Los Angeles Times.

"The first time I went away to prison, they searched me to see if I had a gun — and I had three of 'em on me. They'd ask why I was carrying and I'd say I live in a bad neighbourhood.

"It was true. In our neighbourhood, if you weren't carrying a gun, it was like you were the rabbit during rabbit-hunting season."

During his acting career, Sirico also had parts in films such as Goodfellas, Mickey Blue Eyes and Crazy Joe. While he was the voice of Big Daddy in the cartoon show, The Fairly OddParents.

In late 2013, the dad-of-two voiced the character of Vinny Griffin, who was the family's pet dog in Family Guy.

He reunited with his fellow Sopranos stars in 2019 for the show's 20th anniversary.

Dominic Chianese who played Corrado John 'Junior' Soprano Jr.

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Junior was Tony's uncle, mentor and leader and a surrogate-type father after Tony's dad died.

He was head of the DiMeo crime family before Tony took over and their relationship was fraught with rivalry.

He also tried to kill his nephew twice, first in a plot with Tony's mother Livia and then again whilst battling dementia.

Thinking Tony was a home intruder, Junior shot him in the stomach and then hid in his wardrobe. Tony was left fighting for his life in a coma.

Junior was arrested before being put in a mental institution where Tony's son AJ arrived with a knife and tried to get revenge for his father, citing what Michael Corleone did in The Godfather.

Actor Chianese, who recently celebrated his 90th birthday, also starred as Johnny Ola in The Godfather Part II.

After The Sopranos he went on to have a part in Mr. Popper's Penguins, Boardwalk Empire, and The Good Wife.

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He has four daughters, two sons and 13 grandchildren as well as great-grandchildren. He's also been married five times, with one lasting just six weeks. He's now been happily married to Jane Pittson since 2003.

In recent years, the singer and guitarist has toured retirement communities singing to patients with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

And in 2019, he starred as Enzo in NBC drama The Village.

Meanwhile, speaking about Gandolfini's death, he previously said: "I was shattered. I cried like a baby. Jimmy was like a homemade wine. I loved Gandolfini, I’ll always love him."

Federico Castelluccio who played Furio Giunta

Charming, loyal and kind Furio fell in love with the one woman he shouldn't – Tony's wife Carmela.

He was imported from Naples to New Jersey to join Tony's mob, but when the mutual attraction between him and Carmela grew he was left in a dangerous predicament.

Should he kill Tony to get his woman?

After almost pushing Tony into the blades of a helicopter he vanished without a trace, presumably going back to Italy.

When his character was written out of The Sopranos, actor Castelluccio continued with acting work as well as pursuing his love of art.

He went on to be a guest judge on the Celebrity Apprentice when Donald Trump asked him to choose which star had designed the best hat. He picked La Toya Jackon as his winner.

The 56-year-old is also an internationally renowned award-winning realist painter and art collector with immense knowledge of the Baroque masters.

In 2010 he unearthed a previously forgotten masterpiece by Guercino at a gallery in Frankfurt which he paid £43,000 for.

It went on to sell at auction in 2014 for a reported £6.2m.

Meanwhile, in December, he told how he still wears Furio's “bloody” black leather jacket he sported onscreen after buying it from the show.

“I do actually still wear the clothes," he said.

"This black leather jacket I’m wearing was in a brothel scene, and it still has the blood splatters that stained the jacket on the inside lining.”

And he revealed how people are shocked when they hear his American accent as they expect him to sound like Furio, when in fact he grew up in New Jersey.

Steven Van Zandt who played Silvio Dante

Silvio aka Sil was Tony's silent but violent second-in-command in the DiMeo crime family.

As a youngster, Sil had dreamed of becoming a singer but it wasn't meant to be and instead he found himself managing strip club Bada Bing.

Sil was always impeccably dressed and loved an Al Pacino impression. The character was also the one tasked with killing Christopher's girlfriend Adriana.

In the final season, Sil is shot outside Bada Bing while trying to flee with Pasty Parisi. He is rushed to the hospital and put in intensive care. Doctors say that he is unlikely to regain consciousness.

Van Zandt, now 70, was already a star before he joined The Sopranos cast. He is also known as Little Steven or Miami Steve and is a member of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band.

As a teenager, he was involved in a near-fatal car accident that saw him crash through the windscreen. He covered the resulting hair loss with his famed bandanas.

He is also married to Maureen Van Zandt, 69, who played his on-screen wife Gabriella in The Sopranos.

In 2016, Maureen told American Idol judge Jennifer Lopez to "f*** off" when she rudely forgot her husband's name on TV while he was a guest mentor.

Meanwhile, in 2006, Van Zandt launched the independent garage-rock label Wicked Cool.

A year later, he set up the educational Rock And Roll Forever Foundation, aimed at teaching the music's history and cultural impact to a younger generation.

Then in 2012, he starred in, co-wrote, and was the executive producer of Netflix series Lilyhammer. He played Frank Tagliano, a former New York gangster, who fled to Lillehammer, Norway after having to testify against his Mafia boss. The show was cancelled in 2015.

Van Zandt has also raised a huge amount of money for charity and has his own podcast called Little Steven's Underground Garage – Coolest Conversations.

Steven R. Schirripa who played Bobby 'Bacala' Baccalieri

Dad-of-two Bobby was one of the more lovable characters in the show. His caring nature was evident in the way he looked after Junior.

He was also one of the only capos not to have a mistress..

Bobby was rocked by the death of his wife Karen in a car crash and was comforted by Tony's sister Janice who he went on to marry and have a daughter with.

The character was killed in the final season on Phil Leotardo's orders as he was about to buy a vintage train set.

Actor Schirripa, now 63, revealed in the first two seasons he had to wear a fat suit to fit the role of Bobby.

After The Sopranos he starred in numerous TV shows and films as well as publishing a number of books including Big Daddy’s Rules: Raising Daughters Is Tougher Than I Look.

He went on to create Uncle Steve’s Italian Specialities – a range of organic vegan pasta sauces.

And he is the host of a podcast called Talking Sopranos which he presents alongside Michael Imperioli, who played Christopher.

Speaking about his close relationship with Dominic Chianese (Junior), he said: "He was very patient with me. He's soothing, sweet and nice, not some crazy guy throwing sh** around. We talked a lot about acting and he became a mentor to me all those years we worked together."

Describing what it was like to work with Gandolfini, he added: "He gave a sh** about people and he was nothing like Tony Soprano.

"He wasn't a gangster, he wore Birkenstocks and he loved music. Lots of people thought he would be like Tony Soprano in real life but he wouldn't go onto any talk shows to show them that he wasn't like that. He was shy when it came to that; he didn't think he was interesting enough."

Vincent Pastore who played Salvatore Bonpensiero

Known as 'Big Pussy', Sal was killed and dumped in the sea for ratting out Tony to the FBI and agreeing to be an informant.

He had been an essential part of Tony's operation but when faced with the prospect of 30 years behind bars or to feed information to the feds, he chose the latter.

Tony's suspicions about his betrayal were confirmed when he found a wire hidden under a false bottom of a cigar box in Pussy's bedroom.

The mob boss asked Pussy to check out a new boat with him, Paulie and Sal before they all fired a bullet at him.

Actor Vincent Pastore, now 74, and married with a daughter, says he was "devastated" when his character was killed off in the second series.

He said last year: “When the third season started to air, I wasn’t even watching it for a while. I tell you the truth: I was devastated that this show became a huge hit. And financially, career-wise, I wasn’t a part of it.”

He added: "On the positive note, I was the first Soprano to be available for projects and I was grabbing them."

Rapper Diddy even offered him a modelling job.

He made appearances in Mickey Blue Eyes, Blue Moon, The Hurricane, Riding in Cars With Boys, and several other films between 1999-2001.

In 2006 he took part in TV show Celebrity Fit Club and lost almost two stone. He went on Dancing with the Stars a year later but pulled out after a week as he said the training was too physically demanding.

He also featured as a contestant on the Celebrity Apprentice and had a fake bust-up with Piers Morgan.

More recently he's started his own podcast Fuhgeddaboudit.

And in 2019 Pastore launched a tomato sauce business under the name of Vincent Pastore's Italian Sauce.

Like Michael Imperioli, he lent his voice to film Shark Tale as Luca the octopus.

He also frequently shares iconic snaps from the show on his Instagram.

Joseph R Gannascoli who played Vito Spatofore

Obese gay mobster Vito had arguably one of the more gruesome deaths with a pool cue inserted up his rectum after he was beaten to death on Phil Leotardo's orders.

Character Vito, married with two children, was revealed as gay in the fifth series when Finn – the boyfriend of Tony's daughter Meadow – saw him carrying out a sex act on a security guard in a car park.

Finn kept what he had seen a secret.

But when Vito was later spotted dancing provocatively in a gay club and word got back to Tony, he fled to New Hampshire and began a relationship with Jim 'Johnny Cakes' Witowski.

He later returned to New Jersey to see if he could get back in the crew.

Away from the show, actor Gannascoli has been heavily involved with The Sopranos tour. According to reports, he has in the past been known to sell merchandise out of the back of his car and sign photos for $20.

Last year, the now-62-year-old raised $30,000 to deliver food to frontline workers during the coronavirus pandemic after his 104-year-old aunt beat the virus.

“It makes me feel good. I’m just trying to make a difference, something I can teach my daughter,” he said.

Frank Vincent who played Phil Leotardo

Frank Vincent's character Phil Leotardo often came to blows with James Gandolfini's on-screen persona Tony Soprano, especially after his brother Billy was murdered by Tony's cousin Tony Blundetto (played by Steve Buscemi).

After years fighting for a spot at the top, and a long stint in prison, the show saw him eventually became the boss of the Lupertazzi crime family in New York.

Phil also ordered the deaths of Vito Spatafore, Bobby Baccalieri and Silvio Dante, before his own grisly killing which saw him repeatedly shot and his wife's car roll over and crush his head. His murder was the last one shown on the show.

In addition to appearing in the last two series of the much-loved HBO TV show, actor Frank also enjoyed a number of starring roles in Hollywood blockbusters.

After gaining the attention of director Martin Scorsese, he played a tough guy part in 1998 hit Raging Bull.

He also notably portrayed real-life gangster Billy Batts in mob classic GoodFellas, released in 1990.

Frank returned a third time for Scorsese in 1995 crime drama Casino, where he once again shared the screen with Robert DeNiro and Joe Pesci.

The star died aged 80 on September 13 in 2017 in a New Jersey hospital due to complications from heart surgery.

He is survived by his wife, Kathleen, and three children.

Vincent Curatola who played Johnny 'Sack' Sacrimoni

Chain-smoking New York crime boss Johnny Sack was cold and calculating – and fans loved him.

He took over as boss of the Lupertazzi family when leader Carmine died. He was also devoted husband to wife Ginny and dad to daughters Allegra and Catherine.

The character was incredibly sensitive to comments made about his wife's weight and ordered the killing of Ralph Cifaretto, who had made fun of her size, before later calling the hit off.

Johnny went on to be arrested and while behind bars developed lung cancer and died at medical centre for prisoners with his wife and daughters by his side.

Vincent Curatola's portrayal of Johnny earned him two nominations in the Screen Actors Guild Awards.

He went on to appear in a number of films and TV shows, including Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Life on Mars and The Good Wife.

Now aged 67, he sells personalised videos for fans on Cameo for £75, and is vocal about US politics.

Speaking about the The Sopranos earlier this month, he said: "The show still attracts generations of new fans. I liken it to going to a museum and seeing a 300-year-old painting. I think that’s how The Sopranos will be viewed in the future – as an iconic piece of art."

And he added: "Jim’s passing in 2013 was a horrible ripple through our lives. He was a fun and loving guy – and of course not at all like Tony Soprano."

John Ventimiglia who played Artie Bucco

Chef Artie, a childhood friend of Tony's, was devastated when the restaurant he had inherited from his father burnt to the ground.

And devastation turned to fury when he discovered Vesuvio had been firebombed on Tony's orders.

He always kept a distance from Tony's criminal activities and came across as a hapless fool at times, even falling for Christopher's girlfriend Adriana, despite being married to Charmaine.

Now 57, actor Ventimiglia has gone on to have a number of film and TV roles, including in Law & Order and The Good Wife.

On a Reddit thread eight years ago, the star revealed his views on whether Tony died in the final Sopranos scene.

He wrote: "I thought it was the first time that you saw someone being killed on film, from the inside. Usually, in a gangster film, you see them get shot, fall down and die. In this, we were all such a part of Tony, that in my opinion, David [Chase] let us be part of Tony's death. Lights out. End of Story."

And speaking about his co-stars he said: "Michael Imperioli and I met in acting school when he was 17 and I was 19. We were very close then, and remain close today. Steve Schirrippa and I are very often in touch. Really, we all have a bond now that will never be forgotten."

He also said he got to keep the bell Artie used to ring when the food was ready, four chef jackets, a giant wooden spoon and a menu from Vesuvio.

Steve Buscemi who played Anthony 'Tony' Blundetto

Steve Buscemi played Tony Soprano's cousin Tony B and also directed four episodes of the series, one of them was 'Pine Barrens' which to many is considered the best of the series.

He made his first appearance in the fifth season after his character was released from prison.

At first, Tony B vowed to turn his back on a life of crime and trained in massage therapy but it wasn't long before he was doing Tony's dirty work.

He ends up killing Phil Leotardo's brother Billy making him the number one target for the Lupertazzi family. He goes on the run and is tracked down by Tony S who shoots him dead much to Leotardo's anger as he wanted to avenge his brother's killing.

The role saw Buscemi earn an Emmy Award nomination. He has numerous other accolades to his name, including a Cannes Film Festival award.

The star has appeared in Reservoir Dogs, Fargo, The Death of Stalin, and Boardwalk Empire.

He also did the voice for the character of Randall in Monsters, Inc.

From 1980 to 1984 he was a New York City firefighter and after 9/11 returned as a volunteer working 12-hours shifts to dig through the rubble and look for missing firefighters.

The actor, now 63, has one son. His filmmaker wife of 30 years, Jo Andres, died aged 64 from complications related to cancer in 2019.

David Chase, creator of The Sopranos, previously said of Buscemi: “Everybody loves him."

Joe Pantoliano who played Ralph Cifaretto

Ralph was the villain of the show before he was beaten and strangled to death by Tony who became suspicious he caused a fire that killed his beloved racehorse Pie-O-My.

The character also killed pregnant Bada Bing stripper Tracee, 20, in an unforgettable and disturbing scene.

Actor Pantoliano, now 69, has appeared in over 150 television, film and stage productions, including playing Cypher in The Matrix.

In 2007 he announced he had been suffering from clinical depression for the last decade but had only recently been formally diagnosed. It prompted him to set up an organisation called No Kidding, Me Too to help others.

Last year, the dad-of-four was hit by a car while walking and rushed to hospital.

His agent later said: “He is home now recuperating. He has stitches and is being monitored for a concussion and chest trauma. He is resting and thankful for all the inquiries."

Pantoliano is very active on Instagram and recently revealed he's had the first shot of the coronavirus vaccine.

He also sells personalised videos to fans on Cameo for £176.

Lillo Brancato who played Matthew Bevilaqua

Young mobster Matt was desperate to impress and rise through the ranks.

He also wanted to gain respect from capo Richie Aprile, so alongside his partner-in-crime Sean Gismonte plotted to kill Chris in a drive-by hit.

But it went very wrong.

Chris got shot before shooting Sean dead. Matt then fled to Richie where he revealed what they had done, but Richie refused to protect him.

After hearing what had happened to his nephew, Tony ordered his crew to find Matt. He was later tracked down to a refreshment shack where he was hiding and was then killed by Pussy and Tony.

Actor Brancato, who also starred as Robert De Niro's son in A Bronx Tale when he was 17, appeared in six episodes of The Sopranos.

During his 20s he was addicted to cocaine and heroin.

In 2005, he was arrested for the murder of 28-year-old off-duty police officer Daniel Enchautegui who confronted the actor while he tried to burgle a home.

Brancato was found not guilty of murder, but guilty of first-degree attempted burglary and was sentenced to 10 years in prison. His accomplice Steven Armento was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

While behind bars he continued to take drugs before a visit from pals set him straight.

In 2017 he said: “I became an actor and achieved a lot early on, and it was all destroyed because of my bad choices of using and abusing drugs.

“On the fateful night of Dec. 10, 2005, a heroic police officer lost his life because of my drug taking and bad decision making.”

Brancato has since returned to acting and says he has been 13 years sober.

The 44-year-old sells personalised videos for fans on Cameo for £37.50 and posts a lot of inspirational messages on his Instagram.

John Costelloe who played Jim 'Johnny Cakes' Witowski

Costelloe's character found himself in the arms of Vito as his gay lover when the mobster went on the run from New Jersey to New Hampshire.

The ex-firefighter, who played a firefighter in the show as well as a chef, appeared in four episodes in 2006 as Jim 'Johnny Cakes' Witowski before Vito left him to return to New Jersey and face the music.

After The Sopranos, Costelloe went on to appear in Doubt.

In 2008, he took his own life aged 47 in his Brooklyn home. His body was found two days later with police saying he suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Costelloe had been playing a hustler in hit play Gang of Seven. Its author Jim Neu said the actor seemed troubled but would not reveal why.

His funeral was attended by Sopranos alumni, Steve Buscemi. The pair had become lifelong friends after working together in the FDNY before they found acting.

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